Curriculum & Planning, Education

Rubrics and What Not

This year, I have been busy refining the 5th and 6th grade curriculum I teach and “standardizing” elements.  While last year I interpreted my school’s standards to mean I had to teach each area of science to both grades — which I found difficult to do without just skimming over the content areas — this year I divided up those standards so that 5th graders learn physical science and earth science, and the 6th graders focus solely on life science.  In developing activities I plan to use again and again, I have  been busy creating tons of rubrics for all of these activities.  While it has been a bit of a pain this year creating them all, it will be WONDERFUL next year when I can just print and copy!

Without a doubt, rubrics are key.  At a school like mine where parents are VERY active in their children’s schoolwork, providing students with the rubrics in advance and grading based on those rubrics has eliminated a lot of issues and conflicts that may otherwise develop. Additionally, grading is much more time efficient with a rubric! Instead of trying to compare student work or arbitrarily assign letters, I can very quickly evaluate a paper, presentation, or project by simply highlighting the box in which the student falls.  That said, I rarely highlight just one box.  Sometimes students fall somewhere in between, or their work is missing an element I would expect in top-mark work.  I generally highlight where students fall and then determine grades — usually by creating a falling scale.

For example, on a 16 point rubric (four criteria at four levels), a full 16 points would score 100%, while a student who earns 12 points (the second level down) would end up with 90% in my class.  I’m not simply taking 12 divided by 16, which would leave students with a 75%, as some teachers do.  I design my rubrics so that Level 3 is “B quality” work — the percentage students are assigned needs to fall in that range as well. I pretty much do this with all my grading, and it has worked really well. I think it reflects student understanding better than doing a flat “points to percentage” type thing. I can hold my students to high standards (and keep those full 16 points a bit elusive!) without killing students grades for work that is still of good quality.

Anyway, here are some of the rubrics I have been working with this year.  They are all available at my TpT store if you’d like to check them out!

Advertisements
Lesson Plans, Middle School, Resources, Science

Unit Assessment: The Story of A Rock

This past week, my sixth grade students wrapped up their unit on earth science.  Over the last few weeks, we have covered topics like the layers of the earth, plate tectonics, rocks, minerals, the rock cycle, weathering, and erosion.  To sum it all up, I asked students to create a story about a rock, tying together these different topics.

A few students emphasized the story part (missing the science), while a few got the science down pat but missed the mark on the storyline. One group, however, did an EXCELLENT job with not just their story and science but also their animation! These students used an iPad app to animate their Story of A Rock.

Enjoy!

 

PS – For more information about the Story of A Rock assessment, check out the listings at my Etsy and TeachersPayTeachers stores.  You can buy the instructions and rubric for only $1.50!